Local handicrafts feature inside restaurant Lucky Chan by MAIA Design Studio

The interiors of the Lucky Chan restaurant in Bengaluru use local material in plenty along with incorporating Indian craft techniques within a more contemporary context.

by STIRworld Published on : Jan 06, 2021

India-based MAIA Design Studio has designed a casual Asian restaurant in Bengaluru, Karnataka, using local materials and traditional Indian handicrafts in its interiors. The restaurant called Lucky Chan, in its current location, was meant to be a space for a home. However, the 150 sqm layout was too fragmented and had a very low ceiling height for it to be a residential structure. The ground floor area of the two-storey home was then leased out to be designed as a chic restaurant.

  • Floor seating of the restaurant | LUCKYCHAN | MAIA Design Studio | STIRworld
    Floor seating of the restaurant Image: Gokul Rao Kadam
  • One of the dining sections of the restaurant | LUCKYCHAN | MAIA Design Studio | STIRworld
    One of the dining sections of the restaurant Image: Gokul Rao Kadam

The interiors of the Lucky Chan restaurant feature local material in plenty and the use of Indian craft techniques in its design within a more contemporary context. With this vision for the interiors in mind, the designers at MAIA Design Studio collaborated with the local artisans of a nearby township called Channapatna. The collaboration resulted in a 250 module wooden installation inside the restaurant, and was executed by Atul Johri and Mubarak.

One remarkable feature of the installation is that it is 100 per cent eco-friendly and handmade, with over two centuries of in-hand lathe woodwork and natural lacquering tradition behind it. The colours for lacquer have been derived from plant-based sources such as Manjista root for red colouring, turmeric and tesu flowers for yellow, indigo extracted from indigo dyes, and walnut bark for brown tones.

  • Module of the Channapatna installation | LUCKYCHAN | MAIA Design Studio | STIRworld
    Module of the Channapatna installation Image: Gokul Rao Kadam
  • Handmade modules made with all natural dyes | LUCKYCHAN | MAIA Design Studio | STIRworld
    Handmade modules made with all natural dyes Image: Gokul Rao Kadam

Every module for the installation is hand turned and the forms have been kept modern to fit the contemporary context of the space. The modules are fixed at a distance of 450 mm apart from each other in a grid format. The large inverted beams that cut the space on all sides, have been affixed with mirrors. The mirrors also reflect the installation, thereby creating the illusion of the modules extending to infinity. This also helps in making the visual of the room open up and make it lighter, while also making the large 900 mm beams disappear.

  • The installation’s grid format on the ceiling | LUCKYCHAN | MAIA Design Studio | STIRworld
    The installation’s grid format on the ceiling Image: Gokul Rao Kadam
  • Individually hand-turned modules | LUCKYCHAN | MAIA Design Studio | STIRworld
    Individually hand-turned modules Image: Gokul Rao Kadam

In accordance with the theme of using local materials in its interior design, the restaurant features yet another locally sourced element, which is the light grey granite sourced from Sadarahalli, a place in the southern Indian state of Karnataka, which has a type of granite named after it. Along with this granite, there is a light birch wood paneling that has been used extensively on the walls and floors of Lucky Chan to create a neutral backdrop to the pastel palette. Intricate layering of the light grey granite gives the light and airy interiors a subtle texture and the patterned mosaic tiles in red, green and yellow colours pop out against the natural textured quality of the granite and birch wood. The contrasting tones of the pastels and the neutrals give the restaurant a sprightly yet sophisticated appearance.

  • The neutral greys of the granite and birch wood against pastel walls | LUCKYCHAN | MAIA Design Studio | STIRworld
    The neutral greys of the granite and birch wood against pastel walls Image: Gokul Rao Kadam
  • Patterned mosaic tiles | LUCKYCHAN | MAIA Design Studio | STIRworld
    Patterned mosaic tiles Image: Gokul Rao Kadam

The restaurant design also make use of raw silk lamps, which have been custom made in Pondicherry. The chairs for the restaurant have been hand-woven with coir, which is another traditional crafting practice, and is usually used for making charpoy or the traditional Indian day bed. While the interiors have been designed with a keen effort to incorporate as much local craft as possible, it also fits within the palette of the restaurant and its contemporary atmosphere.

The coir chairs and raw silk lamps | LUCKYCHAN | MAIA Design Studio | STIRworld
The coir chairs and raw silk lamps Image: Gokul Rao Kadam

(Text by Shreeparna Chatterjee, editorial trainee at stirworld.com)

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