Nendo and Georg Jensen join hands on sculptural vase collection dubbed ‘Mizuki’

The Japanese design studio headed by Oki Sato has collaborated with the reputed Danish silverware brand to create three nature-inspired pieces with slender, delicate forms.

by Jerry ElengicalPublished on : Dec 01, 2021

Japanese design studio Nendo has collaborated with Danish silverware company Georg Jensen on a new collection of vases inspired by forms seen in nature. Titled Mizuki, all three pieces in the set are made of sterling silver, hammered and cut into their final forms - combining qualities of Japanese minimalism with the Danish design brand’s exquisite craftsmanship. The result is a trio of three, decidedly delicate-looking pieces typified by a blend of smooth curves flowing into clean lines, with surfaces that exhibit an exquisite metallic sheen.

  • The collection is a set of three vases inspired by forms seen in nature | Mizuki by Nendo and Georg Jensen | STIRworld
    The collection is a set of three vases inspired by forms seen in nature Image: Hiroshi Iwasaki
  • Nendo’s Chief Designer Oki Sato was initially inspired to collaborate with Georg Jensen following a visit to the brand’s atelier in Copenhagen | Mizuki by Nendo and Georg Jensen | STIRworld
    Nendo’s Chief Designer Oki Sato was initially inspired to collaborate with Georg Jensen following a visit to the brand’s atelier in Copenhagen Image: Courtesy of Georg Jensen

Nendo’s Chief Designer Oki Sato shares in an official release, “There are many Georg Jensen designs that rely on nature as their primary motif; like a flower or a plant, or just abstract and organic forms you see in the natural world. I felt that this was something Georg Jensen and Japan’s culture had in common.” The Danish brand has over a century of expertise in crafting homeware and jewellery, with many designs that have been heavily influenced by floral and botanical motifs.

Sato drew from the element of water while creating the pieces | Mizuki by Nendo and Georg Jensen | STIRworld
Sato drew from the element of water while creating the pieces Image: Courtesy of Nendo

In a similar vein, Mizuki draws from the element of water, which, as Sato mentions, “is special for Japanese people who live in an island nation surrounded by oceans, where many make a living through agriculture.” He notes that the initial inspiration for the joint venture emerged from a visit to Georg Jensen’s atelier in Copenhagen, where he discovered the brand’s decades-old craftsmanship traditions.

  • The pieces are intensively polished to achieve a sublime, lustrous finish | Mizuki by Nendo and Georg Jensen | STIRworld
    The pieces are intensively polished to achieve a sublime, lustrous finish Image: Hiroshi Iwasaki
  • Each piece is cut and hammered by craftsmen from a thick sheet of sterling silver  | Mizuki by Nendo and Georg Jensen | STIRworld
    Each piece is cut and hammered by craftsmen from a thick sheet of sterling silver Image: Hiroshi Iwasaki

Sato made full use of the craftsmen’s prowess in the collection - with each piece requiring 400 hours of work from a highly-skilled artisan for completion. The process commences with a thick sheet of sterling silver that is repeatedly melted at high temperatures and then cut and hammered to achieve the final slender profiles of the three designs. Following this phase, the pieces are subjected to several rounds of intensive polishing - as is the case with all Georg Jensen creations - to imbue them with a sublime, lustrous finish. The sculptural qualities of the product designs were developed to look appealing, both when standing alone or in pairs. With heights of 11cm, 20cm, and 28.7cm, the three pieces are titled Nendo Vase 1508A, 1508B, and 1508C respectively.

  • The pieces have been designed to look appealing while standing alone or in pairs | Mizuki by Nendo and Georg Jensen | STIRworld
    The pieces have been designed to look appealing while standing alone or in pairs Image: Hiroshi Iwasaki
  • Sato does not want each piece’s functionality to be limited solely to that of a vase | Mizuki by Nendo and Georg Jensen | STIRworld
    Sato does not want each piece’s functionality to be limited solely to that of a vase Image: Hiroshi Iwasaki

Sato states that he does not want each piece’s functionality to be limited to purely that of a vase for flowers, or a carafe for water or wine - instead expressing a desire for users to put their own spin on them. The Tokyo-based designer notes, “I picked the abstract name Mizuki so that each object can be interpreted in various ways and people can use it however they want to. Apart from being used as a vase, you can arrange flowers that float on the surface of each piece by adding enough water. On the other hand, the spout on the side allows the piece to be used as a jug.”

  • Flowers can be arranged to float on the surface of the water in the vase | Mizuki by Nendo and Georg Jensen | STIRworld
    Flowers can be arranged to float on the surface of the water in the vase Image: Hiroshi Iwasaki
  • The Japanese designer picked the abstract name ‘Mizuki’ to allow users to interpret the collection as they wish | Mizuki by Nendo and Georg Jensen | STIRworld
    The Japanese designer picked the abstract name Mizuki to allow users to interpret the collection as they wish Image: Hiroshi Iwasaki

Available for purchase from November 2021 onwards, Mizuki is a stunning new addition to Nendo’s illustrious portfolio, which includes a sun-like cauldron for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, the iconic Stairway House in Tokyo, and the Coen cars concept for children.

The spout on the side of each object allows it to be used as a jug | Mizuki by Nendo and Georg Jensen | STIRworld
The spout on the side of each object allows it to be used as a jug Image: Hiroshi Iwasaki

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