Five trends from Maison&Objet 2022 pushing the limits in contemporary design

Sanjyt Syngh shares five contemporary design trends that he observed at the September iteration of Maison&Objet in Paris.

by Sanjyt SynghPublished on : Sep 18, 2022

From immersive spaces to decadent décor, the Maison&Objet 2022 in Paris, France, crafted an extravaganza for the design and lifestyle community, pulling people from all over the world to the mecca of creativity. Hosted from September 8 to September 12 at the Paris Nord Villepinte and coinciding with Paris Fashion Week, the design event showcased a spectrum of emerging brands and creatives who presented a range of fascinating everyday artefacts - from decorative pieces, furniture design, and fashion accessories, to textiles, fragrances and tableware.

Having walked down the halls and closely observed its eclectic presentations, here are five design trends for STIR from the design fair.

1. Colour Power

  • Vibrant pieces by Elizabeth Leriche include vases, textiles, baskets, hampers, and chairs | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    Vibrant pieces by Elizabeth Leriche include vases, textiles, baskets, hampers, and chairs Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces
  • According to Leriche, Colour Power calls for shock therapy to counter the ambient doom | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    According to Leriche, Colour Power calls for shock therapy to counter the ambient doom Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces
  • Glassware collection by Pols Potten | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    Glassware collection by Pols Potten Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces

Colour Blocking, probably the most powerful trend in fashion has forayed, at supersonic speed, into the home decor industry. Done beautifully, this trend was a powerhouse at the September issue of Maison&Objet. Highlighted by Maison, a full space based on this theme was curated by Elizabeth Leriche. In her words, “Colour Power calls for shock therapy to counter the ambient doom. A rich, thoughtful palette energises and sets the tone for interiors, just as it provokes our senses and emotions.” Elizabeth Leriche proves it to us by emphasising both these shades and their saturation, their brightness, shine, or matte qualities. The scenography of these spaces go beyond our five senses. It’s a bit of the 70s, it’s a bit of modernism. It is the right collaboration of colours and material exploration to create a unique eccentric character.

2. Tropical Maximalism

  • The aesthetic of access at the Philipp Plein stand | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    The aesthetic of access at the Philipp Plein stand Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces
  • Silk Ka arrangements create flower frenzy| Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    Silk Ka arrangements create flower frenzy Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces
  • Abhika Home Couture presents a vibrant tropical allure with their collection | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    Abhika Home Couture presents a vibrant tropical allure with their collection Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces

Maximalism is a reaction to minimalism. Maximalism is a reaction to the mundane house chores during COVID-19. Now throw in a tropical forest and you get this trend which was vibrantly screaming at Maison. Wikipedia describes Maximalism, in the arts, as an aesthetic of excess. The philosophy can be summarised as 'more is more’, contrasting with the minimalist motto “less is more”. There is one basic rule of design, “Don’t be scared!!” Philipp Plein didn’t shy away from this rule. One could see nearly every inch of space filled if not all. There was an explosion of colours, textures, patterns, and styles. It was an eclectic combination of mismatched décor that turned out not only harmonious but also a visual treat. Be it an explosion of colour or be it a tonal tropical tone, Silk Ka flowers used both variations to their advantage done thoughtfully and with a lot of attention to detail.

Curation is what separates maximalism from chaos. Symmetry brings a sense of balance, while the colours and graphics connect the dots. Maximalism is here to stay and refuses to be ignored!

3. Power Opulence

  • A visually decadent setup by Philipp Plein | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    A visually decadent setup by Philipp Plein Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces
  • A Rolls Royce was seen wrapped in Cheetah print at the Philipp Plein showcase | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    A Rolls Royce was seen wrapped in Cheetah print at the Philipp Plein showcase Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces
  • Overlapping colours and textures take prominence at the Roberto Cavalli Home collection | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    Overlapping colours and textures take prominence at the Roberto Cavalli Home collection Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces

When decadent bling meets powerful prints, you get what I call Power Opulence. Cheetah print being the connect, all brands had their own language. Some subtle, some bold, and some blingy. You take what suits you! Known for what he does best – Philipp Plein displayed a high voltage, extravagant set-up in decadent proportions with his signature fashion attitude. A Rolls Royce wrapped in Cheetah print was like caviar on a charcuterie board.

Roberto Cavalli didn’t shy away from adding animal prints to dinnerware. The term silverware could be changed to goldware in this case.

4. Tonal Tranquility

  • The Sphere Bubl vase with ornate detailing presented by 101 Copenhagen | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    The Sphere Bubl vase with ornate detailing presented by 101 Copenhagen Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces
  • Amorphous functional sculptures by Bina Baitel  | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    Amorphous functional sculptures by Bina Baitel Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces
  • Home décor with a nomadic touch by Le Coin Sauvage | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    Home décor with a nomadic touch by Le Coin Sauvage Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces
  • A vase by Poldr Design | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    A vase by Poldr Design Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces

A villa in Bali or a glass penthouse in Copenhagen, this monotone trend was highlighted by the overuse of the colours derivatives. The understanding of this style, even though restricted to multiple tones of a single colour, felt fresh. Poldr Design started with white or black and then introduced the concept in ultramarine blue. 101 CPH pushed their limits by experimenting with shapes, forms and materials, while Le Coin Sauvage brought a nomadic touch to a tranquil white elegant space.

5. Experiential Experience

  • Pure forms and warm materials come together at the table setting by Waww La Table | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    Pure forms and warm materials come together at the table setting by Waww La Table Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces
  • Nature-inspired motifs for dinnerware by Waww La Table | Maison&Objet | Paris | STIRworld
    Nature-inspired motifs for dinnerware by Waww La Table Image: Courtesy of Sanjyt Syngh Objects + Spaces

Experiential Experience is the retaliation to the dulling effect of the ambient doom. It offers a playful universe for a cheerful journey that is lively, entertaining and yet personal at the same time. In a space as tiny as a dining table, a tone is set for each individual to have an experience based on their personality. The absence of individualism might not be as striking as its presence. By gathering inspiration from any personal experience, one can satisfy the wanderlust without ever leaving home.

What do you think?

About Author

Recommended

LOAD MORE
see more articles
3759,3863,3799,3844,3660

Keep it stirring

get regular updates SIGN UP

This site uses cookies to offer you an improved and personalised experience. If you continue to browse, we will assume your consent for the same.
LEARN MORE AGREE