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Andaz opens its first hotel in Germany designed by Concrete

Netherlands-based studio, Concrete, recreates the cultural and artistic diversity of Bavaria with Andaz’s first hotel in the German city of Munich.

by Pragnya Rao Jul 24, 2019

Like a kaleidoscope, hotel Andaz Munich in Schwabing reflects the culture and tradition of the neighbourhood, creating a stimulating and inspiring atmosphere where guests and locals can feel at home. Designed by Netherlands-based architecture studio Concrete, the design scheme weaves state-of-the-art technology and old traditions into the interior, reflecting what makes Munich unique, forming a sense of tension that can be found throughout the hotel design. The ceiling structure illustrates this contrast via a literally interwoven network of rough wood and high-gloss anodised metal. The connecting axis between the different areas, which brings all functions together in a single hybrid space (we share), is a lively place to meet and mingle.

The many facets of Bavarian culture run like a leitmotif through the design. This is reflected from the largest scale to the smallest details; for example, the diamond shape (the Bavarian flag) is placed over the whole layout like a matrix, while details like deer horn buttons on the cushions remind one of Bavarian fashion.

  • A two-storey green wall at the entrance provides a leafy frame for the iconic curved steel staircase| Andaz Munich Schwabinger Tor| Concrete| STIR
    A two-storey green wall at the entrance provides a leafy frame for the iconic curved steel staircase Image Credit: Wouter van der Sar
  • A cosy, casual seating arrangement lends an informal vibe to the lobby | Andaz Munich Schwabinger Tor| Concrete| STIR
    A cosy, casual seating arrangement lends an informal vibe to the lobby Image Credit: Wouter van der Sar

Stone floors and luminous ceilings with diamond patterns and real copper, copper-coloured design details in room numbers, indirect lighting, leather sofas, herringbone oak floors, as well as polished chrome and brushed steel - all these elements together create a mixed array of surfaces and facets.

“We tried to capture today’s Munich as much as possible, as well as the things that have shaped the city over time, such as breweries, beer gardens, trendy bars, the Englischer Garten and museums, as well as the local area and the history of Schwabing and the Bohemian scene,” explains Melanie Knüwer, interior designer at Concrete Amsterdam and project manager for Andaz Munich.

At the heart of the Lonely Broccoli restaurant is its open kitchen, which is connected to the lounge with an iconic glass display wall| Andaz Munich Schwabinger Tor| Concrete| STIR
At the heart of the Lonely Broccoli restaurant is its open kitchen, which is connected to the lounge with an iconic glass display wall Image Credit: Wouter van der Sar

In a nod to the Englischer Garten and Munich’s numerous other parks and green spaces, the conference area features a green wall of vertically hanging plants. The lounge, the hotel’s generously proportioned entrance area, has a typical Bavarian feel, and was designed as a space where guests can come together to enjoy a casual chat along with a drink or snack. The lounge also boasts of different types of seating, including the ‘golden pretzel’ — a decorative metal seat that is already becoming something of a selfie hotspot.

Knüwer adds, “The biggest challenge, however, was to interpret the city’s traditions in a new way, to create a modern, contemporary environment that reflects the city’s way of life in an abstract way, while also satisfying the demands of today’s international travellers.”

Finished in brass and petrol tones, sky bar M’Uniqo is all about opulence and richness| Andaz Munich Schwabinger Tor| Concrete| STIR
Finished in brass and petrol tones, sky bar M’Uniqo is all about opulence and richness Image Credit: Wouter van der Sar

The rooms at Andaz Munich Schwabinger Tor feature works by Munich art director and typographer Mirko Borsche, who has won a number of German and international awards and is one of the country’s most popular designers. In the lounge, video installations by Munich-based artist and creative director Yves Peitzner have been set up and depict the city’s skyline over 365 days. Peitzner has also won several awards for his work and is one of the key players in the local creative scene. In addition, Munich-based designer Saskia Diez has teamed up with La Bottega to develop exclusive room fragrances and bath amenities for the hotel.

A modern loft was the inspiration for hotel rooms where instead of conventional walls, two raw steel frames divide it into a bathroom, bedroom and living area to create a contemporary en-suite| Andaz Munich Schwabinger Tor| Concrete| STIR
A modern loft was the inspiration for hotel rooms where instead of conventional walls, two raw steel frames divide it into a bathroom, bedroom and living area to create a contemporary en-suite Image Credit: Wouter van der Sar

Speaking of the collaboration with Hyatt’s Andaz, Roland Wüst, a member of the management board at Jost Hurler and head of Schwabinger Tor project, explains, “Schwabinger Tor is international, multicultural, and innovative in its approach. We are ready to leave behind old ways of doing things and pursue new ideas. This is a philosophy that is also apparent in the concept for the Andaz hotel. The way it involved local artists, its innovative approach to customer service, and the fact that the interior design is individual, yet still has an international feel.”

Most suites have a separate dining, work and living areas with a small kitchen, the same concept of raw steel frames is applied here to create a loft-like, open sense of space| Andaz Munich Schwabinger Tor| Concrete| STIR
Most suites have a separate dining, work and living areas with a small kitchen, the same concept of raw steel frames is applied here to create a loft-like, open sense of space Image Credit: Wouter van der Sar

It is quite evident that many icons associated with the city of Munich have been reinterpreted or abstracted as small highlights drizzled throughout the hotel, while traditional materials have been given a modern interpretation via a contemporary design language. Hence, this is the hallmark of the new breed of luxury hotels that are here to stay.

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About Author

Pragnya Rao

Pragnya Rao

Trained as an interior designer, Pragnya has spent 15 years in the design field. She was the Features Editor at ELLE DECOR India and Architectural Digest India, and more recently, the Editor at beautifulhomes.com. As a designer, she has styled shoots for leading brands and also been a part of India Design Symposium for five years.

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