Building façades that STIRred 2019

STIR picks the most innovative building façades of 2019, created using different materials, sustainable features and novel design approaches.

by STIRworld Published on : Dec 30, 2019

More often than not, buildings successfully capture the collective attention of many because of their impressive elevations. Without a doubt, the first thing one notices about a structure is its façade. From using sustainable construction techniques such as repeated brick bonds, to employing cutting-edge technology to form creatively seminal architectural envelopes, these striking building facades of 2019 stood out for both functionality and aesthetics.

1. ARC, Sydney, Australia
by Koichi Takada Architects

Arc, a mixed-use building, contributes to the narrative of Sydney with the use of artisanal bricks in arch formations and the steel and glass towers rising into the skyline.

The unique brick façade of the podium blends seamlessly within the delicate historic context, creating a public through-site connection between Clarence and Kent Streets. Its roof has been designed with 59 fins that travel up the length of the building, culminating in an organic crown feature, instantly distinguishing Arc from the rest of the skyline.

Read the full article here.

Kent Street elevation of Arc| Façade Round up 2019 | STIRworld
Kent Street elevation of Arc Image Credit: Tom Ferguson

2. THE IMPRINT, Seoul, South Korea
by MVRDV

Designed by Dutch architectural firm MVRDV, The Imprint complex is spread across two buildings in close proximity to Seoul’s Incheon Airport. It features a nightclub in one and an indoor theme park in the other. The Imprint’s windowless structures feature three key design elements: imprints of the façade features of surrounding buildings, lifted entrances, and a golden entrance spot covering one corner of the nightclub building.

Given the complexity of facades, the numerous individual panels were made from glass-fibre reinforced concrete that were cast in moulds produced using the 3D modelling files. As many of the 3,869 panels are unique, the construction required moulds to be individually produced using MVRDV’s 3D modelling files from the design phase. Once installed, these panels were painted white in order to emphasise the relief in the design.

Read the full article here.

The entrance to The Imprint appears as if it were lifted like a curtain while a gold spotlight were lighting up its steps | Façade Round up 2019 | STIRworld
The entrance to The Imprint appears as if it were lifted like a curtain while a gold spotlight were lighting up its stepsImage Credit: Ossip van Duivenbode

3. ODUNPAZARI MODERN MUSEUM, Eskişehir, Turkey
by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Designed by Japanese architecture firm Kengo Kuma and Associates, with firm partner Yuki Ikeguchi leading the project, the museum’s architecture is best articulated as wooden, boxy masses, stacked on top of each other, and is envisioned to be a modern, iconic landmark. 

Odunpazari in Turkish means ‘wood market’ – the museum’s envelope rendered in timber signifies and indicates this connect and the city’s history as an old, timber-trading market. The site is situated at the brink of the old and new; Odunpazari is Eskişehir’s oldest area of settlement, and is famous for its narrow, winding streets and traditional Ottoman houses fashioned from wood, with protruding upper floors - another inspiration behind the timber design of the façades.

Read the full article here.

Odunpazari Modern Museum in Eskişehir by Kengo Kuma and Associates | Façade Round up 2019 | STIRworld
Odunpazari Modern Museum in Eskişehir by Kengo Kuma and Associates Image Credit: Courtesy of NAARO

4. LEEZA SOHO, Beijing, China
by Zaha Hadid Architects

Boasting of the world’s tallest atrium winding within its form, the skyscraper designed by Zaha Hadid Architects is enveloped in a single, glazed façade shell, while the rotating atrium connects its two volumes in a dynamic pas de deux (a ballet dance duet), with interlinking skybridges on levels 13, 24, 35 and 45.

The sculptural form's skylight floods the building with natural light, acting as a thermal chimney with an integrated ventilation system. This helps maintain positive pressure at lower levels to limit air ingress, and also provides an effective method of filtering the air inside the tower.

Read the full article here.

The Leeza SOHO tower is designed by architectural giant Zaha Hadid Architects | Façade Round up 2019 | STIRworld
The Leeza SOHO tower is designed by architectural giant Zaha Hadid Architects Image Credit: Hufton+Crow

5. XIQU CENTRE, Hong Kong
by Revery Architecture

Designed by award-winning Canadian studio Revery Architecture in collaboration with Ronald Lu & Partners Ltd, the performing arts venue opened earlier this year, receiving eye balls for its dramatic curvilinear façade.

At dusk, the glowing envelope is redolent of lanterns glinting behind a beaded stage curtain, akin to the type used in traditional theatre. The metal panels woven into the façade are gently pulled back at the four corners of Xiqu Centre, and some pulled open at various locations, mimicking the movement of swaying curtains. These intriguing openings across the elevations appear as light boxes, reminiscent of abstract art works from Xiqu (traditional Chinese opera and theatre) costumes, radiating light outside and providing a glimpse of the inside as well.

The fabrication of the elevations was planned to create an effect of a curtain, which resulted in the employment of a modular system of scaled fins, computer numerical control-cut from untreated marine-grade aluminium pipe. These are set in an alternate patterned array along the building’s façade, and the aluminium will weather over time to develop a natural patina, creating a rustic aesthetic.

Read the full article here.

The Xiqu Centre is a performing arts venue in Hong Kong, designed by Revery Architecture| Façade Round up 2019 | STIRworld
The Xiqu Centre is a performing arts venue in Hong Kong, designed by Revery Architecture Image Credit: Courtesy of Revery Architecture

Comments

Comments Added Successfully!

About Author

Recommended

LOAD MORE
see more articles
1540,1607,1634,1593,1601

Keep it stirring

get regular updates SIGN UP

Collaborate with us

This site uses cookies to offer you an improved and personalised experience. If you continue to browse, we will assume your consent for the same.
LEARN MORE AGREE