Piccolo House by Wood Marsh charms with its façade in autumnal tones

The new headquarters for Piccolo in Australia include retail spaces, a penthouse office and luxury residential apartments with scenic views of the urban Melbourne skyline.

by Jincy Iype Published on : Nov 05, 2020

Reflective windows rendered in colours of autumn define the exterior of the Piccolo House, the new headquarters and benchmark development by the Piccolo group in South Melbourne, Australia. Designed by Wood Marsh architecture, the project joins luxury residential apartments, commercial spaces, onsite parking and a penthouse office occupied by Piccolo, in one unified space. The collaboration illustrates the mutual respect shared between the Australian developer and architecture firm, cemented in shared philosophies of “quality, boldness and refinement.”

The accented, reflective glass exterior with autumnal tones | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
The accented, reflective glass exterior with autumnal tones Image: Trevor Mein

Situated in close proximity to the iconic South Melbourne Market, Piccolo House’s aesthetic and design is prompted by its site context. It emerges from its heritage legacy right below, as an ordered, concrete monolith with precise cut-out openings that are angled subtly, revealing accented reflecting glass elements that “reinterpret the autumnal tones of the brickwork in the neighbouring laneway. Akin to a block of stone being carved into, the mass references the lintel as a symbol of strength providing the structural framework for the building,” share architects Roger Wood and Randal Marsh, Founding Partners, Wood Marsh.

  • Piccolo House | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Piccolo House Image: Trevor Mein
  • Concrete monolith with precise cut-out openings | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Concrete monolith with precise cut-out openings Image: Trevor Mein

The multi-use building’s unique island site allows its architecture to be expressed along all its faces. Apart from housing private tenancies within, the original Victorian terrace building that addresses Dorcas Street was restored and reinstated as an active commerce centre contributing to the streetscape, connecting with the neighbourhood. “The Charles Street laneway references Richard Giblett’s paintings on the contemporary metropolis and reinterprets it into physical urban art using the materiality of Corten and various shades of steel. By night this intervention becomes illuminated, drawing similar ideas to the artwork of Dan Flavin, by painting the street surface with light. The illumination of Charles Street also creates a sense of safety through passive surveillance,” says the firm.

  • Piccolo House responds to its context | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Piccolo House responds to its context Image: Trevor Mein
  • Piccolo House seen at night | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Piccolo House seen at night Image: Trevor Mein

The interior design mimics the structure’s exterior, inherently connected with the architecture. Mirrored glass and blackened metal greets one at the entrance of the Piccolo House, accessed by the entry via John Street. Autumnal tones carry over to the mirrored glass in the roomy lobby. Sheer black curtains cover the floor to ceiling windows that adorn the insides, with sleek furniture and coloured rugs that provide some visual relief to the clean interiors.

  • Entrance lit up at night | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Entrance lit up at night Image: Trevor Mein
  • Entrance lobby | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Entrance lobby Image: Trevor Mein

The four levels that sit above house well-crafted one and two bedroom apartments with picturesque views of Melbourne’s urban skyline. According to the design team, the Piccolo penthouse office at the upper level employs silver travertine to “reinforce the solidity of the building, and to make an appropriately elevated interior response to the overarching idea of stone being carved away.”

  • Inside the penthouse | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Inside the penthouse Image: Trevor Mein
  • Living room and kitchen | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Living room and kitchen Image: Trevor Mein
  • Black sheer curtains in the penthouse meeting room | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Black sheer curtains in the penthouse meeting room Image: Trevor Mein
  • Study with floor to ceiling windows | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Study with floor to ceiling windows Image: Trevor Mein

Here, the colour palette intentionally transitions into a duskier theme, with dark timber, black and bronzed metal decorating the spaces. The mirror and fittings inside the bathrooms are done in black, mirroring the floors and walls covered in black marbled tiles with white threading. 

  • Sleek, coloured furniture livens up the simple interior | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Sleek, coloured furniture livens up the simple interior Image: Trevor Mein
  • Bathroom | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
    Bathroom Image: Trevor Mein

Wood Marsh fluently unites the new and old, exterior and interior, retail architecture and residential design within the Piccolo House. “Piccolo House stands as the embodiment of its developer and owner as a successful model of a progressive build-to-rent property and a new home for Piccolo’s own office,” says the firm.

Luxury residences with views to the Melbourne skyline | Piccolo House by Wood Marsh | STIRworld
Luxury residences with views to the Melbourne skyline Image: Trevor Mein

Project Details

Name: Piccolo House
Location: 5 John Street, South Melbourne, Australia
Year of completion: 2020
Client, Developer: Piccolo
Architect: Wood Marsh

Comments

Comments Added Successfully!

About Author

Recommended

LOAD MORE
see more articles
1469,1395,1592,1494,1636

Keep it stirring

get regular updates SIGN UP

Collaborate with us

This site uses cookies to offer you an improved and personalised experience. If you continue to browse, we will assume your consent for the same.
LEARN MORE AGREE